Category Archives: Recipes

Winter Slaw

This is a nice little salad that’s refreshing in the depths of winter. It’s great with crab, and beef and pork roasts because it’s so light and sparkly against those flavors.

Winter Slaw

1 cup thinly sliced cabbage

1/2 of a Pink Lady apple, finely sliced

1/4 c walnuts, toasted

1 T coconut flakes, toasted

1 T extra virgin olive oil

1 tsp apple cider vinegar

2 tsp white wine vinegar

salt and pepper to taste

Winter Slaw

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Filed under pork, pork roast, Recipes, salad, SCD

SCD Pumpkin Pie

Several years ago, my dad got into roasting his own pumpkins and convinced me that canned pumpkin was a poor imposter of the real stuff. Personally, I think it’s just a heck of a lot easier to peel open a can and go, but now that I’m SCD All The Time, I take the long road. It really does taste better than canned, I’ll give my dad that. It’s way more dense and the flavor is more complex.

Be warned that this is very rich. Hog that I so proudly am, even I can only handle a slice at a time. Plus, I serve it with whipped French cream. I made this for Halloween, but it would also work well for Thanksgiving, of course.

Crustless SCD Pumpkin Pie

2 c roasted and pureed pumpkin (to do this, peel, de-seed, and 1-inch-cube a pie pumpkin, roasting the pieces in the oven at 350F for an hour or two until very soft, then puree in your food processor)

1/2 c French cream (probably dripped SCD yogurt would also work)

1/2 c honey

3 eggs

1 T coconut flour

1 tsp cinnamon

1/2 tsp dried ground ginger

1/2 tsp ground nutmeg

1/4 tsp kosher salt

  1. Preheat oven to 350F.
  2. Butter a 9″ glass pie dish.
  3. Mix the wet ingredients together in a bowl.
  4. Sift the dry ingredients into another bowl.
  5. Mix the dry ingredients into the wets bowl using a whisk, and then pour it all into the baking dish.
  6. Bake for 55 minutes, watching near the end to make sure the sides aren’t browning too much. If so, cover them with foil.
  7. Serve with French cream whipped with a little honey.

Here it is just coming out of the oven:

And here it is served with whipped French cream:

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Filed under dessert, gluten-free, halloween, holiday recipes, pumpkin, Recipes, SCD, Thanksgiving, Uncategorized

Quince Liqueur

It’s my favorite time of year: quince time! I’m starting with about 25 lbs this year. Should be enough to make everything on my list:

  • Jelly
  • Vinegar
  • Liqueur
  • Poached
  • Stuffing for Thanksgiving

A friend of mine has a speakeasy party every December where many attendees bring their homemade hooches to share. I always bring quince, but this will be the first year I’m trying an SCD-legal version. Here’s the recipe I’m using:

SCD Quince Liqueur

4 c or 750 ml vodka

2/3 c water

1 1/2 c honey

2 medium-sized quinces, grated

  1. Combine the water and honey in a saucepan and bring to a low boil. Boil for five minutes.
  2. Meanwhile, pour the vodka into a large jar.
  3. When the honey-water mixture is ready, strain it into the vodka jar. Straining it will remove any foam. Set the jar aside.
  4. Wash and dry the quince to remove their fuzz.
  5. Quarter and grate them, and add to the jar. Should look something like this:
    Quince liqueur in a jar
  6. Shake it well to combine everything.
  7. Shake it once or twice a day for a week, then put in a cupboard (cool, dark place) for a few weeks, shaking it once a week. Should be ready by Thanksgiving.

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Filed under liqueurs, quince, Recipes, SCD, Uncategorized

Pork Belly, Mon Amour

The Man is a devotee of Lardo, one of the best food carts in Portland. They were so very generous in sharing their technique with The Man because he wanted to make me an SCD version of their amazing pork belly (they use sugar, The Man uses honey). Thank you, Lardo! This dish has been one of the highlights of the past 40 years of my life, and what I want to be embalmed in after I die.

Roasted Pork Belly

  1. We’ve been getting ~2.5-lb pork bellies, so this recipe is for that range.
  2. Trim off the skin by running your sharp knife between the skin and the fat, pulling away the skin as you slice through.
  3. Score the fat side you just exposed in both directions about 1″ apart.
  4. Rub the belly all over with 1 T of honey and 1 T of salt for every pound of belly. For example (for the math-o-phobes, ahem), if you have a 2.5-lb pork belly, put on 2.5 T of honey and 2.5 T of salt. Wrap it up and put it in the fridge overnight.
  5. Preheat your oven to 450F.
  6. Unwrap the belly and place it fat side up in a roasting pan.
  7. Put the pan in the oven and roast the belly at 450F for an hour. At 45 mins., you’ll likely need to lightly cover with foil to prevent the top from burning (it will be fairly dark by this point).
  8. After an hour at 450F, reduce the heat to 250F and roast for another 30 mins.
  9. Eat warm or cold. We like it sliced in 1/4″ lengths. Even better cubed and fried in pork fat and butter.
roasted pork belly in a pan

Why yes, I have licked the pan.

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Filed under gluten-free, pork, pork belly, Recipes, SCD

Sorrel Soup and The Pleasures of Aging

What I’ve realized this week is that it’s kind of awesome getting old. Two examples:

  • I read back through some of my creative writing work from 1997. At the time, I had been writing pretty seriously for a few years and I was definitely very committed to writing and improving. So, the pieces I reviewed were not my very first attempts at writing. What I discovered was that while the writing was fine, it was very much a beginner’s effort, of someone still learning how to write well. In other words, 15+ years into my writing career, such as it is, I can now do way better. It was so lovely to see how far I’ve come. Yea!
  • Next is that I gave someone a recipe this morning for sorrel soup that I realize now was pretty vague. But this is how I’m cooking these days. I followed recipes from roughly ages 20-35. But for the past few years, I’ve gotten a lot better at whipping up something from whatever I have around, based on my understanding of how things taste and what goes with what. Essentially, I learned how to cook by following recipes, and now I am reaping the rewards of that learning in the form of being able to cook without recipes. What a milestone!

I’ve always been one for the long haul. I feel like I never truly know something unless I’ve been doing it for a very long time. It’s nice to feel like I have been doing a few things for a long time and I now have some chops to show for it. If this is what it’s like to be 40, I’ll take more!

On a related note, I find that I gravitate towards cookbooks that try to teach you how to cook instead of just giving you recipes to follow. Good examples include Sally Schneider’s books and Julia Child’s Mastering the Art of French Cooking. All of those books are framed on the principle of “master recipes” from which you then make other things (Schneider calls this improvising). This approach/philosophy really works for me. And, of course, with SCD, I have to be really flexible and creative with modifying recipes anyway.

Oh, and another thing. I came home from work one day this week and I’d had a really rough day, at the end of which, I basically obliterated everything I’d worked on all day and was not sure I could get it back. I had to leave work late not knowing if I’d be able to recover all my work the next day. When I got home, I started making chicken curry for dinner. Somewhere in the middle of making it, I realized how profoundly grateful I am that I enjoy cooking. I find it relaxing and engaging, like meditating, and I know that so many people just don’t. For them, it’s a big, boring chore–like doing the laundry or mowing the lawn–and there is no pleasure in the act of cooking. I am so grateful that I do love it, especially given that I’m eating SCD, which is fairly challenging. I really feel for the people that come to SCD with no cooking skills and no interest in cooking. What a tough mountain to climb.

So, here’s that sorrel soup recipe, for what it’s worth.

Etudes des Sorrel Soup

4 cups of chicken stock

4-6 cups of fresh sorrel

nutmeg

ground white pepper

salt

cream of your choice (optional)

Basically, I bring the stock to a simmer and then add the sorrel. Simmer for 15-20 mins or so. Then run this through the blender and add a few shavings of nutmeg, ground white pepper, and salt to taste, and optionally, a cream of your choice (like almond or coconut milk).

Variations include sauteeing some leeks beforehand and then adding the stock to that and going from there. Or caramelizing some onions first and going from there. You get the idea.

And now, back to my coq au vin simmering away on the stovetop and my firm belief that any dish that starts with frying bacon in butter is going to be good.

Sorrel is one of the things that grows really well in Portland, almost too well. I separated my sorrel-jungle in February, and here it is now trying to take over again.

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Filed under Gardening, gluten-free, Recipes, SCD, sorrel, soup

SCD Doritos

This is one of our recent favorite recipes. One of those too-much-of-a-good-thing kind of recipes, ahem. I had to stop making them.

SCD Doritos

1/2 lb grated cheddar

1/4 c peanut flour

1 1/2 tsp red pepper flakes

2 tsp ground cumin

1 tsp paprika

Preheat the oven to 400F. Mix all of the above together in a bowl and spread out on a baking sheet like so.

Ready to go into the oven

Bake at 400 for about 10-15 minutes (keep an eye on it), until very browned. I usually roll the mass off the sheet in one piece while it’s warm, let it cool, and then break into smaller, bite-sized pieces. For some crazy reason, I don’t have a picture of the finished product. What the? Argh.

UPDATE! Photos!

cheese cooked on a baking sheet

Fresh out of the oven. Let it cool just a bit, but not completely. They need to be warmish before you peel them off with a spatula.

Peeling off cooked cheese from baking sheet.

Peeling up the cooked cheese with a spatula--Silpat highly recommended.

Rolled up cooked cheese

Rolled up cooked cheese. Now let it cool completely before breaking into pieces.

SCD doritos on a plate

Et voila! SCD doritos!

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Filed under cheese, crackers, Recipes, SCD

Vanilla Ice Cream

After our football season ended so tragically last weekend, The Man and I consoled ourselves with this vanilla ice cream. Granted, I had planned for this to be a celebration treat. But. So it goes.

Vanilla Ice Cream

1 can coconut milk

1/4 c honey

3 vanilla beans

Makes enough for four, or just two football-depressed people.

  1. Split the vanilla beans down the center with a sharp knife. Scrape out the goodness.
  2. Put the vanilla beans, vanilla paste, honey, and coconut milk in a saucepan and bring to a simmer, stirring occasionally.
  3. Remove from heat and let the mixture sit for several hours so the coconut milk is flavored with the vanilla.
  4. Pour into the canister of your ice cream maker and process.

Note to self: This makes a really rich and coconut-y/vanilla-y ice cream that is awesome. In the past, I always put 1/3 c of honey in my coconut milk ice creams, but since I’ve been cutting back on honey, fruit, and carbs, 1/4 c of honey in this was just fine.

vanilla ice cream in a glass bowl

Go Jets! (sniff, sniff)

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Filed under dessert, gluten-free, Gluten-free vegan, ice cream, Recipes, SCD