Restaurant Kevin Taylor, Denver

Every December 26th, my sugar and I make reservations for a spendy dinner as our Christmas gift to each other. Typically, we’re travelling, so past December 26th dinners have included Campton Place (SFO), Olema Farm House, and Mister A’s (San Diego), to name a few. This year, we found ourselves in Denver, where my in-laws have recently moved.

I didn’t have high hopes for the Mile High City, I must confess. My first two picks, Fruition and Frasca (in Boulder) were closed on December 26th. A tad disappointed, I made reservations for door number 3, Restaurant Kevin Taylor at the Hotel Teatro. I figured it would be good, but there’s just something about a restaurant in a hotel. This is crazy-thinking because I used to work in a hotel in Union Square SFO with a kickass and very well known restaurant, but what can I say, I’m weird that way. Also, there was so much hype about the first two, and I still want to find out if it’s deserved. Maybe next road trip.

In any case, holy foie, RKT did not disappoint. Not only was everything incredibly delish, but ordering was like a dream come true because I only had to ask for one modification: 86 the “cinnamon donut” (wheat bomb) served alongside my foie gras, which, by the way, was the best FG I’ve ever had, daintily mounted atop a mandoline sliver of magical pineapple. For an entree I had seared Australian barramundi, a white freshwater fish that reminded me of something my dad would catch fishing when I was little (except that it tasted good and wasn’t fried Okie-style in cornmeal). Last, and maybe even my favorite course, the cheese plate. I selected a sheep’s cheese (cana de cabra from Spain) and two goat cheeses (pantaleo from Italy, and miticana from Spain). The pantaleo was semi-hard, grainy, and salty–pretty yummy. The miticana was downright spicy on the finish, which completely tripped me out and made me feel so lucky to try it. And the best, the cana de cabra, was a little miracle: grassy, buttery, and like a field on a beautiful spring day. I’m planning to look for it in P-town. Keep your fingers crossed.

Having done this December 26th thing for eight years now, I can tell you that some meals come together and some don’t. RKT really knocked it out of the park. Everything was perfect–food, service, atmosphere, but especially the food, which is always the most important thing. I would go back tomorrow if I could.

When I get all down about my food situation and its unfortunate restrictions, I can think about RKT and be happy again.

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2 Comments

Filed under goat/sheep cheese, Restaurants, Uncategorized

2 responses to “Restaurant Kevin Taylor, Denver

  1. lisainluik

    Geese pate may cause rare disease

    June 24th, 2007 · No Comments

    From Reuters: Geese force-fed and then slaughtered for their livers may get their final revenge on people who favor the delicacy known as foie gras: It may transmit a little-known disease known as amyloidosis, researchers reported on Monday.Tests on mice suggest the liver, popular in French cuisine which uses it to make pate de foie gras and other dishes, may cause the condition in animals that have a genetic susceptibility to such diseases, Alan Solomon of the University of Tennessee and colleagues reported.

    That would suggest that amyloidosis can be transmitted via food in a way akin to brain diseases such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, or CJD, which can cause a rare version of mad cow disease in some people who eat affected meat products or brains.

    Amyloidosis can affect various organ systems in the body, which accumulate damaging deposits of abnormal proteins known as amyloid. The heart, kidneys, nervous system and gastrointestinal tract are most often affected but amyloidosis can also cause a blood condition.

    The researchers used mice genetically engineered to be susceptible to amyloidosis, which can be inherited.

    “When such mice were injected with or fed amyloid extracted from foie gras, the animals developed extensive systemic pathological deposits,” Solomon’s team reported in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

    Sometimes Alzheimer’s disease, the most common form of dementia, is described as a type of amyloidosis as well. Symptoms are often vague and range from fatigue and weight loss to swelling and kidney damage.

    Like CJD, mad cow disease, scrapie and related diseases, amyloidosis is marked by abnormal protein fragments. In the case of CJD, the proteins are called prions.

    “On this basis, we posit that this and perhaps other forms of amyloidosis may be transmissible, akin to the infectious nature of prion-related illnesses,” the researchers added.

    “In addition to foie gras, meat derived from sheep and seemingly healthy cattle may represent other dietary sources of this material.”

  2. mjennings26

    Thanks, Lisa, for this fascinating article. Fortunately, I’m not out eating foie gras every day, so hopefully I have nothing worry about!
    Thanks for reading this blog!
    Melanie

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